29

Jul

Well the royal baby has finally arrived, and just in time, too! This beautiful book Sewing for a Royal Baby comes out August 6th. So what if you’re not technically “royalty?” This book teaches 22 heirloom patterns that will help you create princely wardrobes for your adorable heirs.
See the full list of New and Noteworthy Books in Home + Garden for the coming week, HERE on Riffle.

Well the royal baby has finally arrived, and just in time, too! This beautiful book Sewing for a Royal Baby comes out August 6th. So what if you’re not technically “royalty?” This book teaches 22 heirloom patterns that will help you create princely wardrobes for your adorable heirs.

See the full list of New and Noteworthy Books in Home + Garden for the coming week, HERE on Riffle.

26

Jul

FROM BLOG TO BOOK: 9 BLOGGERS WHO DID IT RIGHT

Thanks in part to the revival of “upcycling,” DIY, and kitschy crafts, the blogosphere is flooded with designers, artists and crafters offering how-tos, creative inspiration, and tips for everything from knitting a retro sweater to decorating your home with flea market finds. The perfect mix of personality, passion and know-how can garner a blog a massive, loyal following. More than ever bloggers are using that influence to springboard to authordom, expanding their empire and gaining greater authority in their fields. Of course, if you have the option of reading online for free, you might balk at the idea of purchasing a book - but trust me, the 9 books below in my list on Riffle are not to be missed. This is blog-to-book done right, so bring these bloggers off the web and into your home!

9 HOME + CRAFT BLOGS THAT SPAWNED GREAT BOOKS

25

Jul

David Stark’s Top 10 Books for Inspiration

artriffle:

With the release of his latest book, The Art of the Party, we asked designer David Stark to share a list of books that have influenced him over the years, books that have helped form him into one of the most creative, surprising event and party designers in the world. From Alice in Wonderland to Tom Friedman, check out the full list on Riffle HERE.image

24

Jul

Q + A Wednesday: Event Designer David Stark

David Stark hates the cold and he love limits because he’s good at pushing them. One of the most creative, surprising party planners around, Stark has staged events from the New York Metropolitan Opera opening gala to Target’s large-scale charitable events and pop-up shops. His inimitable influence is sweeping the design world—and thanks to his books, becoming more accessible for his legions of fans. I’m super psyched to be giving away a copy of his new book, The Art of the Party, HERE

If you’re wondering where Stark gets his inspiration - check out my Q + A with the master of beautiful parties below:image

5-10 books that influence and inspire you?

Tibor Kalman:  Perverse Optimist

Chairman:  Rolf Fehlbaum

Tom Friedman: The Art of the Puppet

Alice in Wonderland

Tara Donovan

Landscapes In Landscapes:  Piet Oudolf

Yves Klein:  With the Void, Full Powers

Bringing Nature Home

Lalannes(s)

Most fabulous thing you’ve ever created? You know, “the most fabulous thing I have created” is for others to point out, right?! What I will tell you is that from the youngest age, I would make puppets out of things that I would find – recycled or thrown-away bits, scraps of fabric, wood, paper bags – really, anything I could find. I was never interested in performing with those puppets, but simply making their characters, and even so many years later, I think a lot about what it was like to create those sculptures, how there were no rules at all. That freedom in the creation process is so central to my current art and design practice.

Your idea of perfect happiness? My perfect artistic scenario is NOT to be told, “do whatever you want,” surprisingly. Rather, I strive for limitations, to be pushed to the extreme – it’s then that we break new artistic ground. That is the dream and the goal. And if that can happen during the summer months, I am happiest! (wink!) I HATE the cold of winter.

Most inspiring place you’ve ever traveled to and how has it influenced your work?  Oh, it is so hard to name a place that is MOST inspiring to me as I find inspiration everywhere, but Paris (and the South of France) will always hold my heart captive. Every tiny thing is chic – the latch on a door, the number on a building. The art that has originated there is obviously incredible – the stained glass windows in the Matisse chapel in Provence, the furniture and lighting fixtures by Giacometti that enhance the Picasso Museum. Versailles, the gardens … everywhere you turn, aesthetics and art making rule from the most grand statement to the most humble. The incredible sense of proportion in French design and art is instructive to me, and they are very good with emotional scale too – when to be quiet and when to scream from the rooftops. I think about that a lot. There is a  lot of sophistication in knowing when to show restraint in design.

Your most prized possession? I have a very small Yves Klein blue monochrome painting that I am pretty darn in love with. For me, Klein embodies the magic of art making. Shamanism at it’s extreme.

One piece of advice for would-be designers? It’s OK to break the rules, but if you do so, make sure you do it BRILLIANTLY.

23

Jul

Book Giveaway Alert ! “The Art of the Party” by David Stark

So excited to be able to GIVEAWAY a copy of this beautiful book, The Art of the Party, by one of the most creative, surprising party planners around! Author David Stark has staged events from the from the New York Metropolitan Opera opening gala to Target’s large-scale charitable events and pop-up shops. His inimitable influence is sweeping the design world—and thanks to his books, becoming more accessible for his legions of fans.

 

In The Art of the Party, Stark’s whimsical, artistic, unexpected designs are often created from sustainable, industrial, or low-cost materials to inspire readers—whether planning a wedding, dinner party, or holiday gathering—looking for ideas for their own events.

Enter HERE to win!!

18

Jul

Q + A: Party Planning Advice From ‘Sweets Stylist’ Amy Atlas

If you’ve ever dreamed of being paid for your love of parties and desserts, you’ll want to read Amy Atlas’s book Sweet Designs: Bake It, Craft It, Style It. Atlas is an award winning blogger (Sweet Designs), and an internationally renowned ‘Sweet Stylists’ and Party Planner, whose been on The Today Show, Anderson, and featured in magazines such as O Magazine, Better Homes and Gardens, People, The New York Times, InStyle, Martha Stewart, Good Housekeeping, and many more. She has created sweets tables for Brooke Shields,Martha Stewart Weddings, O Magazine, and her book shares styling secrets.

Known for bringing a stylish designer’s flair to the dessert field, Atlas has created a guide that is both cookbook and craft-book in one, the first of its kind. I caught up with her to ask a few questions about inspiration!

5-10 books your recommend for creative inspiration, cooking, DIY projects, home decor, crafts, or the like?

The Flavor Bible

The Domino Book of Decorating

The Last Course (Claudia Fleming)

Bouchon Bakery

Martha Stewart’s Cookies and Cupcakes Books

Essential Pepin

Dorie Greenspan Baking

Most fabulous thing you’ve ever created?

My book, Sweet Designs. While I love doing parties, my book is my bible and I’m very proud of it!

Most interesting thing you’ve learned while researching a book? 

I think the most interesting thing I learned was what an enormous undertaking a book can be. It was a monster to create! There was the conceptualization of the ideas, creation of the recipes/crafts, testing the recipes/crafts, writing, execution of photo shoots, editing and then marketing. It gave me a new perspective of how much love goes into books.

Your idea of perfect happiness?  

Healthy family, friends, beach, lots of green, sun, blue skies. Chocolate would’t hurt :) 

Living person you most admire?

A few….Oprah, Bono, Bruce Springsteen. People who have used their notoriety for good causes and who remain humble. 

Favorite place to be in your hometown/where you live?

Central Park. NYC can be very stimulating, but the second I see those beautiful green trees I feel serenity.

Your most prized possession?

Not really a possession, but my biggest gift is my children.

One piece of advice for a busy hostess?

Plan your menu and décor at least 5 days in advance. Make some dishes a few days in advance and freeze them.  The last thing you want to be in stuck in the kitchen. There is nothing better than a relaxed hostess!

Check out Amy’s fabulous book on Riffle!

18

Jul

Check out my Book Picks for When it’s Too Hot to Play Outside on Riffle, the best way to discover new books!

Check out my Book Picks for When it’s Too Hot to Play Outside on Riffle, the best way to discover new books!

17

Jul

Maps are the stuff that DIY projects are made of. They are inexpensive, plentiful, and carry a sense of place. That also makes them perfect for creating souvenirs of your favorite trips and excursions. Here are a handful of great projects to recall your travels at a glance…


Lidy takes care of both photos and maps in one tidy project. 
Martha’s thought of where to store all those 1000s of great photos you just took on your last vacation.
Ciera’s pin board map lets her keep track of the places she’s been.
Anne Reeves cleverly affixed a Paris map onto the bottom of a plain glass plate. The image comes through, while the plate remains food safe if necessary.
Chelsea’s boyfriend made her this travel map for a Valentine’s Day gift last year. It’s easily recreated with some string and pins.

(via Travel DIY: Map Your Memories | Apartment Therapy)
Maps are the stuff that DIY projects are made of. They are inexpensive, plentiful, and carry a sense of place. That also makes them perfect for creating souvenirs of your favorite trips and excursions. Here are a handful of great projects to recall your travels at a glance…
  1. Lidy takes care of both photos and maps in one tidy project. 
  2. Martha’s thought of where to store all those 1000s of great photos you just took on your last vacation.
  3. Ciera’s pin board map lets her keep track of the places she’s been.
  4. Anne Reeves cleverly affixed a Paris map onto the bottom of a plain glass plate. The image comes through, while the plate remains food safe if necessary.
  5. Chelsea’s boyfriend made her this travel map for a Valentine’s Day gift last year. It’s easily recreated with some string and pins.

(via Travel DIY: Map Your Memories | Apartment Therapy)

16

Jul

16

Jul

A Pond in a Pot: Building a Miniature Garden

If you love the whimsy and magic of miniature gardening, then head over to Timberpress  for a chance to win a copy of “Gardening in Miniature”! You can even try out a project from the book this weekend with the step-by-step instructions below: A Pond in a Pot

Water features bring an enticing dimension to miniature gardens.

Water features bring an enticing dimension to miniature gardens.

It’s easy to love full-sized ponds and water features—but not the time and  money they require. This simple, affordable miniature offers a captivating  alternative.

MATERIALS

  • Big pot for entire garden
  • Smaller pond pot with no drainage hole
  • Medium-sized plastic plant pots, 2 to 4
  • Plants of your choice
  • Small pebbles
  • Landscape cloth, 12 inches by 12 inches
  • Potting soil
  • Accessories

TOOLS AND SUPPLIES

  • Gloves (optional)
  • Knife
  • Pitcher of water

1. Choose the best place for the pond beforehand; off-center is always more interesting. Figure out the level of the pond in the bigger pot by stacking a couple of plastic plant pots upside down in the bottom of the garden container. The number of plastic pots you’ll need will depend on the depth of your big pot. Place your pond pot on top of the stack. This precarious platform will eventually be surrounded by soil on all sides to keep it safely upright. The level of the pond pot should be about 1 inch higher than the edge of the big pot—so you can visually sit down on the pond’s edge. Play around with the stack of pots—add, take away, or cut off whatever you need to get the pond pot to the right height.

2. Pour in soil around the plastic pot stack, making sure there are no air pockets. Fill up the area with soil and begin planting your garden.

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3. Place taller trees in the back and tier down with shorter plants, finishing off with the lowest plants as you work toward the pond area.

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4. Finish planting and establish the garden bed edges. Prepare the patio space by clearing an area about 1/2 inch deep. Tamp down to get rid of any air pockets.

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5. Line the bottom of the patio area with landscape cloth, which will keep the pebbles clean longer. In this project, because there are minimal garden edges, the liner acts as the border between the soil and pebbles, so no border edging is needed. Pour small pebbles into the patio an inch below the pond’s edge. Tamp down with a flat hand so that the patio surface is level with the garden bed surrounding the rest of the pond pot. Nestle any stepping-stones into the pebbles.230_kb120519_433-WEB

6. Pour clean, clear water into the pond.231_kb120519_445-WEB

7. Add miniature accessories to set off your new pond focal point.232_kb120519_469-WEB

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A pond-side seat offers cool relief on a hot day.

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Text from Gardening in Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living World by Janit Calvo
Photography by Kate Baldwin